Discover Königsallee

One of the Düsseldorf’s flagships and the city’s shopping mile: Königsallee. Affectionately known as the “Kö”, the road is home to numerous luxurious and renowned brands. But Königsallee is more than just a shopping paradise. It is a real tourist attraction, if only thanks to its architectural peculiarities. The restored houses, the fountains, bridges and the ornate railings give the mile its characteristic appearance. Various elements were specially designed exclusively for the Kö: lamps, bollards, clocks, telephone boxes and kiosks are tailor-made in the truest sense of the word. Since 1994, Königsallee has been classified as a historical monument.

Shopping spree on Königsallee
Shopping spree on Königsallee

Perfect for a shopping trip

Königsallee is popular not only amongst Düsseldorf’s residents and visitors, but also amongst retailers. The boulevard is home to one renowned company after another. Whether fashion, jewellery, household goods or culinary delights – the Allee has plenty to offer. There are also two huge shopping centres directly on Königsallee. However, the glamour mile also serves as a sort of catwalk for many fashion fans: see and be seen is the motto of the Allee. And with a bit of luck, you might even be able to spot one or another celebrity shopping on the world famous Königsallee.

Kö moat
Kö moat

The green heart of the Kö

Königsallee extends over just more than a kilometre from North to South, from the Hofgarten (Court Garden) to the Friedrichstadt district. The boulevard is characterised by the 580-metre-long city moat through which water from the Düssel flows. Green embankments line the moat where swans and ducks can often be seen tranquilly doing their rounds in the heart of the city. Chestnut trees are characteristic of Königsallee; around 120 of these line the road. There are also various sycamore trees, which add to the overall landscape of the Allee and are conducive to a pleasant stroll. The east and west sides of the Kö are connected by several bridges, which ensures that visitors have no problems in discovering all corners of the Allee.

Kö-Bogen (King’s Bow)
Kö-Bogen (King’s Bow)

The Kö-Bogen

Since 2013, Königsallee has been home to a further office and retail complex: the Kö-Bogen (King’s Bow). The Jan-Wellem-Platz and its surroundings were redesigned in accordance with the plans of the New York architect Daniel Libeskind. The hallmark of the Kö-Bogen building is the curved façade made of glass and white natural stone – a real architectural eye-catcher and also a popular meeting place. Passers-by are particularly attracted by the connection to the Hofgarten (Court Garden), where you can relax and unwind after a shopping trip – with views over nature, but right in the heart of the city of Düsseldorf.

Historical view around 1880
Historical view around 1880

From Kastanienallee to Königsallee

The boom began for the Kö – or “Kastanienallee” (Chestnut Allee) as it was called back then – from 1840. Wealthy citizens built their houses there, and the road with the characteristic moat increasingly became the central point of city life. The Allee got its current name in 1851, as a gesture towards the Prussian king Frederick William IV. A few years earlier, something absolutely unheard of supposedly happened to him on this road: horse manure was thrown at the cloak of “His Majesty”. According to the story, the city fathers of Düsseldorf pondered for a long time how they could make amends for such a humiliation. It was finally decided to rename “Kastanienallee” as “Königsallee” to rescue the reputation of the city.